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How Snoring Can Ruin Your Oral Health


Posted on 1/20/2020 by Office
How Snoring Can Ruin Your Oral HealthDoes your spouse tell you that it's driving them crazy when you saw logs in the early hours of the morning? Maybe you have those mornings you wake up feeling drained even though you went through 8 solid hours of sleep?

Snoring can affect your physical health, mental health, and your circadian rhythm. Yet, what many forget to account for, is its effect on your oral health.

How Snoring Erodes the Teeth


Snoring is an age-old problem and it isn't new to anyone, it just becomes bluntly apparent when you are wide awake and the person next to you is chopping lumber. The problem for those who are snoring is when that cycle of pulling air in through the mouth and out through the nose, it's drying out the teeth. Our teeth use saliva to remineralize and protect themselves with the layer of enamel. When you dry them out, it gives bacteria the green light to start depositing plaque on your teeth. Over a period of time, like every night. This dry out and plague deposit cycle, allows small holes to start to erode into your teeth.

How You Can Deal with Your Snoring and Protect Your Teeth


You may have a child that snores, spouse, or loved one. It affects people of all different ages. The soft tissue in the roof of the mouth vibrates as the air pass over it. It can be caused by issues varying from glands in the throat, nasal issues, allergies, or problems with weight. If you are overweight, it is usually the first recommendation to lose some weight. The excess pressure on the torso is the main culprit. The next option is to narrow down the source causing the snoring. There is a sleep test or polysomnography.

In the polysomnography, a specialist will be able to study the information about your brain waves, heart rate, oxygen levels, sleep stages, eye movement, and much more. All recorded while you are sleeping to determine what the issue is.

Our dental professionals can help with the issue of your snoring even if it isn't related to your mouth. If you don't address the snoring the result is dry mouth. This will speed up your tooth decay, cause sensitive teeth, bad breath, and can eventually result in gum disease.

ORAL SURGERY SPECIALISTS OF AUSTIN

Derrick Flint, MD, DDS | Matthew Largent, MD, DDS