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How Weather Can Affect Your Jaw Pain


Posted on 12/20/2019 by Office
How Weather Can Affect Your Jaw PainThere are people who do not like cold weather for different reasons. Some people hate that they can't enjoy going to the beach as often or even getting their favorite ice-cream daily.

Other people are not fans of the cold weather because it means having to experience and deal with medical complications brought on by the cold. Oral health is not left out on these bummers either. There are enough cases about people experiencing severe sensitivity and jaw pains when it's cold.

What Happens To My Jaw When It's Cold Outside?


The idea is to think about it on a large scale, then try and apply it to your situation. Whenever it's cold outside, the atmospheric pressure falls. The air becomes heavy and therefore everything else. This is the reason why large water bodies begin to solidify and freeze. Now, the human anatomy is made up of joints. Inside the joints, there is fluid known as synovium. So during the cold season, it also changes its state, even though not completely, and makes the joints feel stiffer. When the nerves in the joint receive the stimuli, they perceive it as pain and patients thus experiences jaw pain.

How Can I Deal With The Jaw Pains During Cold Weather?


The best way to avoid the effects of cold weather on your health is to stay warm and heated up. You should avoid exposing yourself to cold foods and drinks as well as stay inside heated rooms. However, a lot of the times when people experience jaw pains, it's usually accompanied by other symptoms such as headache and a painful neck, which indicates a Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD).

The wiser decision would be to get checked and treated by a certified dentist before simple cold weather pains turn into a major oral health problem. Visit our clinic today and get examined thoroughly as you get more information on the topic.

ORAL SURGERY SPECIALISTS OF AUSTIN

Derrick Flint, MD, DDS | Matthew Largent, MD, DDS